Door-in-the-face technique (DIFT)

This is the process used to obtain compliance by others (to make them behave the way you want them to) when a large request is made, knowing that it will probably be rejected in order for someone to accept a very small request. The real goal is to make the most of a small request, which makes it seem very reasonable because it compares to such a large, seemingly insignificant request. In fact, the big request gets you a “door face” when you ask us. This technique is used in marketing, strategy, diplomacy, sales, and charity.

For example, someone may ask you to donate 5 hours of your time a week for the next year as a volunteer for a charitable organization. After hearing this offer, you may think it is a big request, after which you may be asked to, instead of committing all this volunteer time, just donate a small amount. Compared to the time commitment, this technique seems very acceptable.

Source: Buzzle.com

The following examples will illustrate the “door in the face” technique used in different fields.

Friend to Friend

Request one: Can you watch my dog for the whole day? [Response is] “No.”

Request Two: Can you watch him for an hour while I go to the market?

Employee to Employer

Request one: Boss, can I have a 60% hike in my salary? [Response is] “No.”

Request Two: Can I have a 20% hike?

Employee to Store Manager

Request one: Can you help me do all this work? [Response is] “No.”

Request Two: Well, can you help me with this bit?

6-Year Old Kid to Mom

Request one: Will you buy me the whole Barbie set? [Response is] “No.”

Request Two: Will you buy me a new Barbie doll?

From Mother to Son

Request one: Can you clean your room by tonight?

Request Two: Can you make your bed by tonight?

Although this approach may seem strange, psychologists have found two reasons why “no” in response to a large request usually leads to a “yes” in answering the next small request.

Conclusion

This technique confirmed my thoughts on how to effectively enter the door. It is a translation of the mind of the “burying” man. People do not like to be disappointed, so when they are presented with a small task after an irrational refusal, it sounds like a big deal. Regarding this particular DIFT, I thought it was very well done. It can be repeated and the variables are strongly defined.

ASHRITH PAWAR S
III Semester MBA, DSCE

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